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As far as we know, he’s the fastest man in the world — he ran the 100-meter dash in 9.58 seconds at a race in Berlin in 2009. That means an average speed of just over 23 miles per hour (top speed is close to 30 miles per hour). His time in Germany in 2009 was 0.11 seconds faster than 9.69 seconds in Beijing in 2008, making him the fattest in the world record set at that distance. Considering the sheer simplicity of his career and the historical importance of his dominance, Bolt is the world’s greatest athlete of the past five years. There is, however, an easier argument than that: over the next 10 years, Bolt’s achievements as a sprinter will be wiped out.
There are no guarantees, of course, but it is certainly more credible than speculation – the men’s 100m record has been under attack over the past 30 years to the point that many former record holders are not up to answering trivialized questions. But that wasn’t always the case: Jim Hines broke the 10-meter barrier at the 1968 High-altitude Olympics with a 9.95; That record stood for 15 years before Calvin Smith ran 9.93(also at altitude) in Colorado Springs. But that record has been broken more than a dozen times since 1983. Ben Johnson’s 9.83 in ’87 was the first big hit, but eight other runners have broken the record with increasing regularity (Bolt just happened to use a sledgehammer).

Shine trader limited
Shine trader limited

The overall result of all this measured subtraction is simple: in the last 40 years, humans have run 100 meters in 0.37 seconds. That’s about $0.01 a year on average, but it’s an underestimate — though the annual growth isn’t exponential or incremental. The pace of change is accelerating. As of June, 17 men have run the 100-meter dash under 10.0, the most in a year (with six months left in the calendar). Most track and field experts agree that bolt, 25, could break the 9.5m barrier at any time if he is as fit as he was in 2009. This leads to the central question track fans have long wondered: Is there a limit to how fast a person can run? Will one day — maybe 50 years from now, or 500 years from now — someone run the 100 meters in 8.99 seconds?

By Ethan